Category Archives: Primaries

A Primer on the Primary: The South Carolina Special Election

Voters in the lowcountry head to the polls today in a special election primary.  The vacancy in South Carolina’s 1st district opened when Republican Tim Scott accepted Governor Nikki Haley’s appointment to the Senate.  This chain of events was of course … Continue reading

Posted in Elections, Polarization, Political Behavior, Political Parties, Primaries | 2 Comments

Jim DeMint’s Retirement: Good News or Bad News for Lindsey Graham?

So yeah, this happened.  While Jim DeMint had publicly stated he would not run seek reelection in 2016, today’s announcement is surprising nonetheless.  And as if his premature retirement wasn’t enough, DeMint has reportedly told state Republicans he wants freshman representative Tim Scott (R … Continue reading

Posted in Elections, Electoral Institutions, Primaries | 4 Comments

In Defense of South Carolina: Institutions Matter

We all know the story of the 2000 Republican presidential primary in South Carolina.  John McCain won New Hampshire by double digits, leading a massive increase in campaign donations, campaign volunteers and press.  In response, the Bush campaign went negative in South … Continue reading

Posted in Elections, Electoral Institutions, Primaries | 8 Comments

Should Ron Paul “Pray for Rain” on the 3rd?

A common elections adage is that Republican candidates should “pray for rain” on election day.  The logic is that rain suppresses voter turnout among unlikely voters (who, in turn, disproportionately identify as Democrats).  The other day Mike Huckabee extended this logic to … Continue reading

Posted in Elections, Primaries | 1 Comment

Does Iowa Matter?

In the mist of an extremely long presidential primary and campaign – as long or longer than I can remember – conversations always reach this question: “Who cares about Iowa?” Obviously campaign fatigue has already hit 10 months out from … Continue reading

Posted in Elections, Electoral Institutions, Primaries, The Presidency, Voting Behavior | Leave a comment