Category Archives: American Political Development

The Filibuster: An “Accident of History”? On the Common Cause Lawsuit.

A few months back, we at the blog had a semi-regular series: “things institutionalists know that you should” (see for example see Josh on timing, Nate on Plott’s fundamental equation, and myself on the status quo bias of institutions).  This … Continue reading

Posted in American Political Development, Filibuster, Legislative Politics, Legislative Procedure | 1 Comment

The Polarization Culprits

Jennifer Victor and Seth Masket recently posted a couple very good posts over at the  Mischeifs of Faction on polarization in Congress. If you aren’t already reading their blog, you should. Both approach the problem from an electoral perspective. There … Continue reading

Posted in American Political Development, Legislative Procedure, Polarization, Political Institutions | 4 Comments

Some Thoughts on Americans Elect, Polarization and Gridlock

In January I was invited to speak at a roundtable hosted by Americans Elect–a nonpartisan presidential nominating organization.  As you may know, Americans Elect (AE) has garnered quite a bit of attention this election cycle from academics and pundits alike (see here for … Continue reading

Posted in American Political Development, Elections, Electoral Institutions, Polarization | Tagged , , | 3 Comments

Institutional Advancement: Do Dan Boren’s Claims Add Up?

Politico published an insightful article yesterday provocatively titled “Members of Congress:  This Job Sucks.”  Much of the article centers on and interview with Oklahoma Representative Dan Boren (D).  Boren is retiring at the end of this session, so he’s using his unique … Continue reading

Posted in American Political Development, Legislative Politics, Legislative Procedure, Political Parties | 3 Comments

How Air-Conditioning increased Polarization

John Farrell has a take on polarization in the National Journal. It’s a really interesting read and I recommend it, particularly if you are interested in the electoral forces at work in polarization. There are several quotes from notable political … Continue reading

Posted in American Political Development, Elections, Legislative Politics, Polarization | Leave a comment

The Cordray Appointment and Congress’s Crisis of Legitimation

Last week Richard Cordray received what the White House called a “recess” appointment to serve as director of the new Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.  (side note: during break I was surprised to learn that a family member was his roommate … Continue reading

Posted in American Political Development, Empirical Theory, Legislative Politics, Legislative Theory | Leave a comment

Unfairly picking on Ezra Klein

Ezra Klein wrote a article about “No Labels,” a non-partisan group dedicated to “Not left. Not right. Forward.” I don’t have a qualm with either the group’s objective or Klein’s take. Actually, I think they are both very good. I do, … Continue reading

Posted in American Political Development, Legislative Politics, Legislative Procedure, Polarization | 6 Comments